Medicinal Porridge


Who else finds that porridge is their ‘go-to’ breakfast in the winter months? Let’s be honest here – it’s a complete comfort food. Creamy and nourishing, its perfect for warming up the body on a frosty morning!

As I’m gluten-free, my go to grain (or pseudograin in this case) is buckwheat. Although I have used buckwheat groats in the past, I prefer to use buckwheat flakes as they provide a creamier consistency and I also find them easier to digest. Buckwheat flakes are actually like rolled oats – they are produced by rolling the whole hulled buckwheat groat.

Buckwheat happens to be a particularly good source of bioflavonoids, especially ‘rutin’, which acts as a strong antioxidant that strengthens the inner lining of blood vessels. It is a wholefood in itself, contributing to a good source of starch, protein, polyunsaturated fatty acids, vitamins B1, C and E, and the minerals zinc, copper and manganese. Have previously written about buckwheat in a previous post - Activated Fermented Buckwheat Bread (Gluten Free).

I have added other ingredients to this recipe for their added benefits:

  • Cacao powder: derived from the cacao bean and is the unrefined form of cocoa. It provides a rich source of flavonoids which act as antioxidants (free radical scavengers). It is also a great source of magnesium – the relaxing mineral!

  • Maca powder: the dried form of the maca root, sometimes referred to as Peruvian Ginseng. It is high in vitamin C, copper and iron, and is traditionally renowned at enhancing fertility and libido (sex drive).

  • Slippery elm powder: this dried herb is derived from the inner bark of the slippery elm tree. Being rich in mucilage, it soothes and coats mucous membranes, providing assistance to tissues of the chest, urinary tract, stomach and intestines.

  • Medicinal mushrooms: a form of tonic herbs, medicinal mushrooms act as adaptogens, helping the body to adapt to a variety of environmental and psychological stresses. They are particularly good at assisting the immune system, nervous system, and endocrine system.

  • Bee pollen: an incredibly nutritious food, bee pollen is the pollen that collects on the bodies of bees. It contains all the nutrients humans require to thrive, particularly protein, and happens to be enzyme-rich, which assists with maximising digestion and absorption of the nutrients from foods. Note if you have allergies to pollen, consult your healthcare practitioner prior to consuming!

  • Chia seeds: an absolute powerhouse, chia seeds are a great source of fibre, protein, fat (especially omega-3s) and a variety of micronutrients. Their high soluble fibre content helps with slowing digestion and assisting with regulating bowel movements.

For this recipe you can substitute the buckwheat flakes for quinoa flakes or even rolled oats (note that oats contain gluten and can only be purchased ‘gluten-free’ from certain suppliers).

Ingredients

  • 1/3 cup of buckwheat flakes

  • 1 & 1/2 cups of liquid (I often use 1/2 cup of almond mylk and 1 cup of water) – this seems like a lot but makes a hell of a creamy porridge

  • 1 tablespoon of cacao powder

  • 1 teaspoon of maca powder

  • 1 teaspoon of slippery elm powder

  • 1/4 -1/2 teaspoon of medicinal mushrooms (I love the Superfeast Mason’s Mushrooms Blend)

  • 1-2 tablespoons of chia seeds

  • 1 teaspoon of bee pollen

  • Approx 1 cup of berries or your chosen fruit

  • Any toppings you like – I love to add a tablespoon of nut butter, some coconut yoghurt and hemp seeds

Method

  1. To a small pot, add the buckwheat flakes and liquid. Heat on low heat, allowing to cook slowly until most of the fluid has absorbed

  2. Once almost cooked, add the rest of the ingredients except the toppings and bee pollen, and mix through

  3. Add your toppings and enjoy every mouthful of warming bowl of deliciousness

This recipe is super nourishing and provides a huge spectrum of health benefits. If you end up trying this porridge out, I’d love to hear how you go making it!


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